My Lent 2019 Book List Plans

Is this the year you really want to dive into Lent? Do you want to come out of this Lenten Season and truly feel that you've had a small share of living in the desert with Christ for 40 days? I know that I do. Maybe it's an upcoming birthday that's making me have more of a now-or-never type of attitude towards Lent. Or maybe I just acutely feel the necessity of truly modeling this for my children, and living it with my husband. Whatever it is, these are the books and resources I'm going to use this Lent to really LIVE the season from Ash Wednesday all the way through to Easter Vigil. Look them over. If something looks helpful to you, use it. If it inspires you, go with it. I hope all of these bless and encourage you.

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My Domestic Church Daily Clips 03/12/2010

  • I hope the pendulum swings - 1 in 3 births as a cesarean is just too much and too high a risk for moms.

    tags: cesarean, childbirth, birth

    • WASHINGTON – Too many pregnant women who want to avoid a repeat cesarean delivery are being denied the chance, concludes a government panel that urged doctors to rethink litigation-spurred policies that have swung the pendulum back toward the days of "once a C-section, always a C-section."


      Fifteen years ago, nearly 3 in 10 women who had a first C-section were able to deliver their next baby vaginally, a trend called VBAC for "vaginal birth after cesarean."


      Now that rate has dropped to 1 in 10, in part because a third of hospitals and half of physicians ban women from attempting VBAC, a panel of specialists convened by the National Institutes of Health said Wednesday.


      But VBAC remains a safe alternative for the right candidates, and when those women try labor, between 60 percent and 80 percent of the time they do give birth vaginally, the NIH panel concluded. It urged that doctors offer mothers-to-be an unbiased look at the pros and cons, so they can decide for themselves.


      "We believe that many women should have an opportunity to give it a try," said panelist and Delaware obstetrician Dr. Nancy Frances Petit of the U.S. Uniformed Health Services.

    • What sparked the latest shift? It's partly concern over litigation, the NIH panel said, because while a uterine rupture remains very rare, it can be devastating to the family and end in a high-dollar lawsuit.


      Case-by-case decisions are crucial, the panel said, because there may be instances where another C-section is better for the baby but not for mom or vice versa.


      Who's a good candidate? The panel said that needs further study. But in general, VBAC is for women who've had one prior C-section done with a "transverse" scar, the most common kind today, said panel chairman Dr. F. Gary Cunningham of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Women should be otherwise low-risk, he said: Not carrying multiples or a large baby, being obese or having high blood pressure or diabetes.


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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