My Lent 2019 Book List Plans

Is this the year you really want to dive into Lent? Do you want to come out of this Lenten Season and truly feel that you've had a small share of living in the desert with Christ for 40 days? I know that I do. Maybe it's an upcoming birthday that's making me have more of a now-or-never type of attitude towards Lent. Or maybe I just acutely feel the necessity of truly modeling this for my children, and living it with my husband. Whatever it is, these are the books and resources I'm going to use this Lent to really LIVE the season from Ash Wednesday all the way through to Easter Vigil. Look them over. If something looks helpful to you, use it. If it inspires you, go with it. I hope all of these bless and encourage you.

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Works for Me Wednesday - Interesting remedial readers for older students


I have had two kids that have been behind grade level in their reading because of small learning disabilities. One of the most frustrating things about having an older child who is struggling with reading is finding them good reading material that isn't too babyish. For example, my 12-year-old daughter who is a struggling reader chose a book at the library to read called Pinky and Rex and the Spelling Bee (Pinky and Rex Ready-To-Read).

 It was a cute little book and she enjoyed it, but it was about second graders and one of them pees his pants after winning a spelling bee. Not exactly the kind of thing my pre-teen was interested in, although her 6-year-old sister enjoyed it. Then I remembered that I had purchased a set of readers for my oldest son from High Noon Books. From their website: 




High Noon Books offers high interest / low reading level books for students, struggling readers, and those learning English as a second language. High Interest / Low Level books are designed to contain content that appeals to a struggling readers' age and maturity level, but are written at a reading level that is lower than the student's grade level.


 A lower readability level provides an opportunity for the student to read words he or she is familiar with, while introducing a few new words and terms. In this way the student should read more fluently and therefore comprehend the story easier.


 A good reading experience will hopefully encourage the student to read more books and develop a joy of reading! –controlled vocabulary –simplified sentences –connected text (not picture books) –engaging stories High Noon Books can serve as a bridge between beginning readers (picture books and stories with only a few words per page) and standard text (as in a magazine, or schoolbook, or trade book). 
 Special Features of High Noon Books 
• Short and fast moving chapters
 • 5X7" paperback format 
• 32, 48 and 64 pages in length
 • Colorful covers and engaging illustrations 
• Type size and line spacing adjusted to reading level

I had purchased the Problem Solvers Biographies and we started reading about Louise Braille.  So I feel as if she is getting a dose of history and social studies as well as working on her reading.  Two of my older sons (including a struggling reader ) had also enjoyed these books.

I would definitely recommend these inexpensive readers to any parents who want good books to hold the interest of their older remedial reading students.


(Note to Linds - my first struggling reader who used these books is now a practicing EMT - working and going to paramedics school.  So there's that...)


Works for Me!


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