Get My Domestic Church in your e-mail box.

Writing a letter to your confirmation candidate

It seems that one of the biggest events in confirmation preparation in this country is the letters of support to be given to the confirmation candidates during their mandatory retreats.

I have three such letters saved on this blog:

Confirmation letter to my daughterConfirmation letter to my fourth sonConfirmation letter to to my third son
I've asked my children what they remember about the letter they got from me and their dad, and also what they remembered about the letters they received. 
The answer was not much, or at least nothing specific. In general they were happy to have gotten a bag full of letters and there was a sense of feeling loved and supported. I guess that's the main thing - for them to have a sense that this is an important step in their spiritual growth, and that people they know, love and respect have taken the time out of their lives to let them know that! So here are some tips on procuring and writing letters for young confirmation candidates. Start thinkin…

My Daily Domestic Clips 09/21/2010 (a.m.)

  • This sounds like a good plan to me, at least worth giving a try!

    tags: catholic education

    • “He is saying what everyone has been thinking for years, but was too afraid
      to speak out loud,” said Brother Brian Carty, founder of the De La
      Salle Academy
      in Manhattan, an independent middle school run by the
      Christian Brothers. “Very few parochial schools draw kids from their parishes
      only. Most of these kids take a subway to school, in fact. If we want Catholic
      education for kids, we have to face these realities.”


      The recession has aggravated chronic budget problems in the archdiocese,
      which paid an additional $30 million in fiscal 2009 to help parishes and schools
      meet expenses, officials said.


      The new initiative would not be the first big retrenchment by the
      archdiocese, which closed or merged 21 of its roughly 400 parishes in a 2007
      consolidation. And it relies on some strategies that church leaders have used to
      try saving Catholic schools elsewhere, including in the neighboring Diocese of
      Brooklyn
      , which last year began creating community boards of lay people and
      priests to administer and raise money for clusters of struggling schools.

    • Now, Archbishop Timothy
      M. Dolan
      is signaling that he will soon mount a more aggressive effort to
      prune the number of schools and ensure the future of those that remain.


      In speeches and articles
      over the last few months
      , the archbishop has sketched the broad outlines of
      a plan that includes consolidating or closing many of the 216 elementary schools
      in the system, changing the way parochial schools are financed and — for the
      first time in the archdiocese’s 160-year history — redefining the basic
      relationship between Catholics and their schools

    • Each elementary school has until now been financed mainly by members of its
      local parish. But in the proposed reorganization, the cost of educating roughly
      56,000 grade school students would be spread among all the parishes, and all the
      plate-passing churchgoers among 2.5 million Catholics in the archdiocese.


      All dioceses have struggled with the steady loss of enrollment in parochial
      schools, which are considered important as feeders for Catholic high schools and
      colleges, and as developers of lifelong faith. Yet despite the loss of more than
      1,500 inner-city schools in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and other major
      cities in the last decade, no church leader has suggested changes as sweeping as
      Archbishop Dolan’s.

  • tags: healthcare obamacare

    • Mrs Hogg was diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer - an aggressive form
      of the disease which affects just four per cent of sufferers - and underwent six
      months of chemotherapy and a mastectomy.


      Her husband, an IT project manager, considered taking legal action against
      the NHS, for what he believes was a 'long summer of misdiagnosis' after a lump,
      initially discovered by his wife in around 2007, was dismissed as harmless
      breast tissue, then mastitis, and was later treated as a cyst.


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Comments