Advent and Christmas Resources and Link Up

My Daily Domestic Clips 09/01/2010 (a.m.)

  • tags: debt college

  • tags: debt college

    • "I think there's a problem in thinking that college has to be the best four
      years of your life," Bissonnette said. "Well, if the best four years of your
      life puts you in so much debt that you can't pursue the career that you want,
      you can't have a family, you can't buy a house, then that's the worst four years
      of your life."


      While you definitely won't be able to follow every single piece of advice and
      save the more than $100,000 the back cover touts, the numerous take-aways make
      this book a worthwhile read. Whether you're a B-average junior in high school
      trying to figure out where to apply or a junior in college with nothing in
      savings, wondering how to finance the second half of your undergrad degree, it'd
      sure be nice if you sent Bissonnette a muffin basket with all that extra money
      you'll have.

  • tags: cancer ovariancancer

    • July 22, 2010 -- A newly identified genetic marker may help predict ovarian
      cancer risk, Yale University researchers report online in Cancer
      Research
      . Variations in the KRAS gene occur in one-quarter of women with
      ovarian cancer, and 61% of women with ovarian cancer who have a family history
      of breast and ovarian cancer.


      "For many women out there with a
      strong family history of ovarian cancer who previously have had no identified
      genetic cause for their family's disease, this might be it for them," says study
      researcher Joanne B. Weidhaas, MD, PhD, an associate professor of therapeutic
      radiology and researcher for the Yale Cancer Center in New Haven, Conn., in a
      news release. "Our findings support that the KRAS-variant is a new genetic
      marker of ovarian cancer risk."


      While BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are known markers for breast and ovarian cancer
      risk, only half of the women with a family history of these cancers tested
      positive for these genes. Fully 60% of these women did test positive for the
      KRAS genetic mutation, the new study shows.


      Women with BRCA genetic mutations tend to develop ovarian cancer at younger
      ages, but those with the new genetic marker tend to develop ovarian cancer after
      menopause, the researchers report.

    • Ovarian cancer is known as a particularly lethal cancer because symptoms can
      be vague and many women are not diagnosed until the cancer has already started
      to spread.


      "People are blindsided when they get ovarian cancer; they really had no
      idea," Weidhaas tells WebMD. "This is a cancer where there are not a lot of
      known risks so there is probably more of an inherited component and it's really
      important to identify ways for us to know who is really at risk."


      What's more, the new KRAS mutation "might predict ovarian cancer in the
      general population as well," she says. "This will require a large study and
      needs additional validation."


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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