Thursday, January 07, 2010

My Domestic Church Daily Clips 01/08/2010





    • Employers and career experts see a growing problem in American society — an abundance of college graduates, many burdened with tuition-loan debt, heading into the work world with a degree that doesn't mean much anymore.


    • The problem isn't just a soft job market — it's an oversupply of graduates. In 1973, a bachelor's degree was more of a rarity, since just 47% of high school graduates went on to college. By October 2008, that number had risen to nearly 70%. For many Americans today, a trip through college is considered as much of a birthright as a driver's license.


    • What's not watered down is the tab. The cost of average tuition rose 6.5% this fall, and a report released on Dec. 1 by the Project on Student Debt showed that the IOU is getting bigger. Two-thirds of all students now leave college with outstanding loans; the average amount of debt rose to $23,200 in 2008. In the last academic year, the total amount loaned to students increased about 18% from the previous year, to $81 billion, according to the U.S. Department of Education.

      Meanwhile, the unemployment rate for recent grads rose as well. It is now 10.6%, a record high.






    • With almost 40% of the nation's college-age students in some form of post-secondary education — and tuition costs as high as they've ever been — we don't really have a handle on what students learn at university. Or whether they're learning anything at all


    • re colleges given too much respect?

      Universities definitely get too much of a free pass. We have not gotten
      in the habit of asking hard questions about whether or not universities are
      doing a good job of teaching their students. Some of them are. There are
      fantastic universities, fantastic departments, fantastic programs, but there
      are also terrible universities, terrible departments, terrible programs. And
      the great fiction is that there are none of the latter. Listen to the way
      that we talk to students about the admissions process. Even as they compete
      for the best students, schools say, "It's all about fit. It's not about
      finding the best university. It's about finding the university that's right
      for you." And so there's this polite fiction that every university is right
      for some student, and every student is right for some university. Well,
      that's just not true.





  • Getting a mini-spike in hits from AGH blog. If you are here from there welcome-  here are the links you are looking for.
    Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.
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